Costumes Inspired by your Dental Office!

Not sure which costume to buy this year? Need some last minute inspiration? We’ve got you! No one else at the party will be wearing these!

Darla from Finding Nemo

Costume

Who could forget Darla the “Fish Killer” from Finding Nemo? She’s the niece of Dr. P. Sherman (42 Wallaby Way, Sydney) and with a Dentist for an Uncle you know she’s getting a deep discount on that headgear!

Toothbrush, Toothpaste, and Tooth

The classic trio. If you’re looking for group costumes, this is a combo that’s sure to stand out. You might even remind your friends to brush after all of that sticky candy you’ll be eating Halloween night.

Gag Teeth

Costume

Now this is crazy – kudos to the parents who spent the time to make this get-up. No one else in their class will have this costume.

The Tooth Fairy

Of course, you could go with the traditional beautiful woman in a tutu with wings and a tooth wand – but there’s something hilarious about a grown man in a leotard.

Your Dentist, of course!

Costume

This year a costume that already incorporates a mask is PERFECT.

And finally the scariest costume of all…

The Patient

Costume

She tells you she flosses everyday, but her gums say otherwise. Nothing is scarier to a hygienist than this patient!

 

Whatever you go as this Halloween, be safe, have fun, and give us a call if all the sweets give you a tooth ache!

 

Happy Halloween from Dr. Shahriary and Staff!

Iconic Teeth From Your Favourite Movies

Halloween is coming up – this year your costume can be instantly recognizable with some iconic teeth! Movies and TV shows use prosthetic teeth, natural imperfections in the actors teeth, and make up to give their characters a distinct look.

Winifred Sanderson, Hocus Pocus

The oldest of the Sanderson sisters was obsessed with beauty and youth so it makes sense that the costume designers gave her comically large teeth that don’t meet “conventional” beauty standards.

Austin Powers, The Austin Powers movies

Powers’ bad teeth were created by a dental technician named Gary Archer. Mike Myers came to Archer and told him, “I want bad British 1960s teeth”, based on a widely-held stereotype. Archer took pictures and made drawings of British patrons at an English pub that he often visited and the pictures became the inspiration for the final design Archer showed Myers, resulting in his iconic smile.

Lloyd Christmas, The Dumb and Dumber movies

When Jim Carrey was a child he got into a fight, resulting in the chip in his front tooth. The tooth was capped and Carrey had it temporarily removed to portray Lloyd Christmas.

The Mad Hatter, Alice in Wonderland

Johnny Depp has said the Mad Hatter’s iconic smile was inspired by comedian Terry Thomas’ diastema. In an interview Depp said, “the French call the teeth with the gap in the middle ‘les dents de bonheur’ – ‘the teeth of happiness’,”. A fitting inspiration for the (sometimes) jovial Mad Hatter.

Harry Lyme, Home Alone 1 and 2.

Harry’s gold tooth plays an important role in his identification. When he first enters the McCallister’s house impersonating a police officer, Kevin notices his gold tooth when he smiles. As a result when Kevin is almost hit by Harry and Marv’s van Harry smiles at him again and Kevin notices the gold tooth, blowing his cover as a police officer.

Stu Price, The Hangover

Did Ed Helms REALLY pull out his own tooth for a movie role?! Well, kind of! When Helms was a teenager he had a dental implant placed. Instead of blacking out a tooth for the movie he decided to talk to his dentist to see if he could have the 20 year old implant crown temporarily removed. His dentist agreed to remove it and the rest is movie history!

Belletrix Lestrange, Harry Potter Movies

Though Belletrix’s rotten teeth are never specified in J.K. Rowlings’ book, actress Helena Bohnam Carter felt the gnarly teeth would give her character a feral look. As Bellatrix had spent so much time in prison, Carter felt her teeth should look savage and deranged as she hoped to portray her as such.

Dracula – 1958 Starring Christopher Lee

Vampire fangs have an interesting history in Hollywood as most people associate fangs with Bela Lugosi’s popular 1931 portrayal. Lugosi, however, never wore fangs in his role as Dracula. In the era before microphones actors needed to enunciate for optimal clarity; prosthetic fangs impeded this greatly. Fangs were not popularized in vampire films until Christopher Lee’s iconic portrayal in 1958.

Let us clean up your “fangs”! Call today to book an appointment.

Tongue Traits That Tell The Truth

Your tongue plays an important role in your development. Beginning in your infant years, licking everything from the floor to your Mom, to your teen years with your first kiss, or even a daring taste of spicy food.

But did you know your tongue can tell you a lot about your oral and overall health?

White Patches

Irritation from smoking or tobacco use can cause a condition called Leukoplakia. This appears in the form of white patches on your tongue. While they are often nothing to worry about it is important to have those white patches checked by your dentist for oral cancer.

Hairy

A protein build-up can cause small bumps to become elongated trapping food resulting in what looks like strands of hair on your tongue. Typically a good brushing or tongue scraping will take care of it, but if it doesn’t, it’s time to see your dentist.

Overly Red

This is most commonly associated with a vitamin deficiency, such as folic acid or B-12. The solution could be as easy as taking a multivitamin in the morning. Rarely an overly red tongue can be an indicator of Kawasaki disease.

White Coating

Our tongues are supposed to be a shade of pink. When there is a white coating all over it there could be two main causes. First is that you aren’t brushing your tongue well enough. Second, if you are brushing daily and the white coating isn’t coming off it is likely oral thrush.

Tender or Sore

If your tongue feels tender or sore all over you could be having an allergic reaction. Soreness in one spot only could indicate an oncoming canker sore. Soreness should clear up on its own but if it persists it might be time to call us to book your next appointment.

Denture Care – What You’re Doing Right and Wrong

A denture can help your smile look and feel its best. But what happens when you aren’t caring for it properly? A poorly cared for denture can lead to bad breath, infection, and your appliance becoming misshapen.

How to Properly Store Dentures

The American Dental Association recommends storing your dentures in cold water or cleaning solution overnight. Solutions may prevent fungal build-up, bacteria, and foul odors. Make sure to always follow the directions on the package, and to never place your dentures in HOT water as it may can cause your appliance to warp.

Always be sure to rinse your appliance before putting them back in your mouth, especially if they have been in a cleaning solution. The chemicals in this type of solution can cause burns, pain and vomiting if swallowed.

Do

Keep your dentures moist when they aren’t in your mouth. The can dry out and lose their shape

Brush and rinse your appliances regularly like you would with your natural teeth

Place the container that holds your dentures somewhere safe where it won’t be knocked over. This will help you avoid dropping your dentures onto a hard surface where they can break.

Go back to your dentist if they no longer feel comfortable in your mouth

Don’t

Χ    Leave your dentures in overnight. This can cause bad breath and plaque build up

Χ    Place them in boiling water to clean them. This can cause them to become misshapen

Χ    Use hard bristle tooth brushes or abrasive toothpaste to clean them. Always be sure to use a denture friendly brush

Χ    Use any whitening products or bleaching agents on your appliance. This can damage them

It only takes a few minutes to clean and store your dentures every night to make sure you’ll have clean, fresh, comfortable dentures to wear the next day. Additionally, storing your dentures correctly means that you’re prolonging their life. Follow your dentist’s instructions on denture storage, and if you’re unsure about anything, ask for advice.

Please call us if you have any questions

School snacks for healthy teeth

With the return to school fast approaching our office sees the improvement in your child’s oral health. No more all-day summer snacking and slurping back sugary drinks.

The snacks you send in your child’s lunch can help keep their smile healthy all year long.

School Snacks, Dentist Approved:

  • Fresh fruit and crunchy vegetables. They’re high in fiber and will help fill up hungry tummies. Bonus: chewing crisp fruits and veggies can scrub away food particles and plaque.
    • While citrus fruits, such as oranges, and grapefruit are healthy and delicious,  citrus fruits contain citric acid which can cause enamel erosion. Moderation is important!
  • Unsalted and low-salt nuts, such as almonds or walnuts.
  • A lunch meat and cheese roll up.
  • Cottage cheese or low-sugar yogurt. Both are excellent sources of calcium and vitamin D, which promote healthy bones and teeth!
  • Peanut Butter (especially natural) is packed with fiber and protein. Spread on celery stalks, apple slices, or on wraps with bananas.
  • Small cubes of cheese. Especially cheddar, Monterey Jack, Swiss, and other aged cheeses. These cheeses trigger the flow of saliva which helps to wash food particles away from teeth.
  • Choose water instead of soda or juice!

Uh-Oh! School Snacks to Avoid:

  Dried fruit, fruit leathers and fruit snacks
Not only are they loaded with sugar, but these snacks are gooey and sticky and cling to the surface of teeth and gums.

  • Energy, protein or granola bars
    These may seem like a good choice, but they are very similar to candy bars in the amount of sugar and calories. Many contain sticky dried fruit that cling to teeth  long after the snack is eaten.
  • Cracker snacks
    White flour crackers like goldfish, graham crackers, and bagel chips also stick to teeth. These types of crackers contain carbohydrates that turn into sugar when broken down. Try healthier alternatives like whole grain crackers and triscuits.
  • Sports drinks
    Sports drinks contain extra calories and high levels of sugar, almost as much as soda. They are also  acidic and can contribute to enamel erosion.

Call today for your back-to-school cleaning!

Sleep troubles? How we can help with snoring.

Are you waking up every morning feeling more tired than the night before? Are you being kicked by your partner all night because of your snoring? Sleep doesn’t come easily to everyone.

Did you know dentists have special training to deal with OSA, Obstructive Sleep Apnea? Your dentist can recognize your risk factors for sleep apnea from the size of your jaw opening (too small) and size of your tongue (too large). Both of which can obstruct your airway. Together with your GP we can work towards your good night’s rest.

Sleep apnea doesn’t just make you feel tired, it also affects your oral health. OSA forces you to breath out of your mouth all night which can cause dry mouth which can lead to tooth decay, plaque build up, mouth sores, and periodontal disease.

How we can help you sleep:

When you come in for your next appointment with Dr. Ross, let us know about your sleeping problems. We will contact your GP and request that they send you for a sleep study. Together with your physician we will determine if oral appliance therapy is an appropriate course of action and you will be referred back to our office so we can make your appliance.

Oral appliances for Obstructive Sleep Apnea are a non-invasive way to prevent airway collapse in people with mild to moderate OSA. Many people find it more comfortable and convenient than a CPAP machine. While studies show 92% of patients wearing oral appliances found snoring to be either eliminated or significantly improved.

We want to help you feel rested and refreshed!

Call us today to book an appointment!

 

Source

Surprising Facts About Teeth!

Let’s explore some of the most surprising things you probably didn’t know about teeth!

Your Teeth:
  1. Your teeth’s enamel is the hardest substance in your body. Just don’t test in on bottle caps because…
  2. Teeth are the only part of your body that do not naturally heal.
  3. But on average, people only spend 48 seconds each time they brush – the standard recommendation is 2 minutes!
  4. So three out of every four Americans has some form of periodontal gum disease.
Other Creatures:

5. Some snails have more than 20, 000 teeth, even though their mouth’s are no bigger than a pinhead

6. An elephant’s tusks are actually teeth!

7. Giraffes have the same number of teeth as humans – 32

8. You can tell the age of a dolphin by counting the rings on its teeth – just like a tree

 Historically:

9. Barbers used to pull teeth – talk about a one-stop-shop

10. Most Americans did not brush their teeth every day until after World War 2. In WW2, the military required soldiers to brush their teeth twice a day, and they brought that habit home after the war.

11. Neolithic humans filled cavities in their teeth with beeswax

12. The cotton candy machine was co-created by a dentist who called it “Fairy Floss”. Now that’s surprising!

Your Dentist:

13. DDS vs. DMD – DDS means Doctor of Dental Surgery, DMD means Doctor of Dental Medicine. The degrees are the same as they have the same education but each practitioner can decide what their degree is called.

14. You can’t lie to your dentist – General dentists can tell a great deal about your habits, diet, and oral hygiene routine just by looking at your teeth. They can tell if you floss everyday or just for the days leading up to your appointment. They can also tell what types of foods you eat and whether you grind or clench your teeth.

15. Your dentist is an artist – Dentistry is an artistic as well as scientific profession. Dentists must have an artist’s aesthetic sense, an eye for detail and the manual dexterity to perform precise procedures in a small area.

Call today for your appointment https://austindentalgroups.com/contact/

Pulling Baby Teeth – When and How?

Should you be pulling out baby teeth? How and when is the best time?

Youtube can show you countless creative ways to pull out baby teeth; from the “slamming door” method to newer techniques like the nerf gun. For some kids this is harmless fun, but for others it can be painful and scary.

It’s important to remember that teeth should only be pulled when they are loose enough to come out with very little pulling by the parent or child. Having a loose tooth can become uncomfortable as it can shift around and poke the gums affecting chewing. Remember that you want to make sure the tooth is not pulled out prematurely. Let your child be in control of the situation; this will ease anxiety and fear surrounding losing a tooth.

Your child will likely play with the tooth with their tongue throughout the day, gradually loosening it. If they are becoming anxious to lose the tooth offer crunchy snacks like apples to speed up the process.

When the tooth is truly ready to fall out organically there should be little or no blood, but have gauze ready to clean the area and rinse the mouth out to keep the site clean.

If your child has a loose tooth that is causing pain or keeping them up at night, call our office to make an appointment and we can assess if the tooth will need to be extracted in office.

(604) 936-1263 or email https://austindentalgroups.com/contact/

Don’t forget to read last week’s blog about the tooth fairy for more information!

 

 

Tooth Fairy – Where did the Myth Come From?

Have you ever thought about the American tradition of the tooth fairy? It’s a little strange when you stop and think about it. Where did this odd tradition come from? Why on earth are we rewarding children for their lost teeth?

The concept of the tooth fairy as we know it is fairly modern, but the mythology and ceremony around disposing of baby teeth has evolved and changed over centuries.

In the earliest written records (C:1200) of Northern Europe and Norse traditions,  there is mention of “tand-fé” or “tooth fee”. Since baby teeth were said to bring good luck in battle, Scandinavian warriors often strung baby teeth on strings  and wore them as necklaces. In the middle ages, children in England were instructed to burn their baby teeth or be resigned to hardship in the afterlife, doomed to spend eternity searching for them.

The modern American incarnation of these traditions into an actual Tooth Fairy has been traced to a 1908 “Household Hints” item in the Chicago Daily Tribune:

Tooth Fairy.

Many a refractory child will allow a loose tooth to be removed if he knows about the Tooth Fairy. If he takes his little tooth and puts it under the pillow when he goes to bed the Tooth Fairy will come in the night and take it away, and in its place will leave some little gift. It is a nice plan for mothers to visit the 5-cent counter and lay in a supply of articles to be used on such occasions.

Lillian Brown

While in North America we dispose of baby teeth by way of the tooth fairy – many places around the world have their own traditions:

  • Burying the Tooth – Kids in Afghanistan bury lost teeth in a mouse hole, while parents in Turkey bury their children’s baby teeth in a place they think will bring their child success.
  • Placing It in a Slipper – In the country of South Africa, a lost tooth is placed in a slipper. A magical mouse takes it from the slipper and leaves a gift.
  • Tossing a Tooth – In many countries, such as India, Vietnam, Japan, Korea, and China, people toss the tooth over the top of a roof. This tradition dates back centuries to Middle Eastern countries as well.
  • In a Glass – In Argentina, children put missing teeth in a glass by their bed and hope they’ll get a coin or candy in its place.
  • The Tooth in a Box – Most people in Mexico place a lost baby tooth into a small box next to a child’s bed. The legend is that a magical mouse will come to collect the tooth and leave some coins behind.

Do you do anything special or unique when your child loses a tooth? Let us know! https://austindentalgroups.com/contact/

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tooth_fairy

Ollie, Welcome to the Team!

We would like to introduce the newest member of our dental team, Ollie!

 

Ollie is Dr. Ross and Katty’s new addition to the family. He is an 12 week old Bernedoodle!

Patient’s will sometimes find him at the reception desk with Dani on Mondays as he is still too little to be left at home. Our patients have been happy to see Ollie behind the desk and find him to be a calming presence for our anxious patients. Our staff are trying to convince Dr. Ross to have him in the office as a therapy dog, as everyone who meets him falls in love!

A little about Bernedoodles:

A Bernedoodle is a mixed breed dog comprised of mother and father breeds of Bernese Mountain Dog and Poodle. They are also called “Bernese Mountain Poos”. Bernedoodles are characterized by their cleverness, goofy disposition, loyalty, and gentleness. They are companion dogs through and through. We are expecting Ollie to be a mid-sized dog, weighing between 30-40 lbs.

Bernedoodles are hypoallergenic and even Beth, our receptionist (who is highly allergic to dogs) can hang out with Ollie no problem!

So far this little pup has made a lasting impression in our office. We can’t wait for you to meet him!

 

More about Bernedoodles: https://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/bernedoodle#/slide/1

Book a visit to meet Ollie today! https://austindentalgroups.com/contact/