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Happy Holidays from Dr.Ross and Staff

Wishing you a sparkling holiday season 

May your smiles be Merry and White!

   

 

Snoring and dental problems

If you don`t have good oral health, it can be the reason for your Sleep Apnea.

You can sometimes find early signs of a sleep disorder by visiting your Dentist.

The first sign of having sleep apnea is tooth grinding  (bruxism). Grinding can cause tooth wear and breakage as well as inflamed and receding gums.

A spike in cavities can also be a sign of grinding.

Sometimes mouth`s anatomy and sinuses and Sometimes the eruption of the wisdom teeth can be the reason for snoring.

When the tooth has partially erupted, this causes a flap of tissue to become infected and swollen.

Because of this condition, patients may sleep with their mouth open, leading to snoring.

Snoring also can be caused by a number of factors like allergies, a cold, overweight, or alcohol consumption.

Other risk factors that contribute to what causes snoring include the following:

Being male, Being 40 years of age or older, Pregnancy and family history of snoring.

 

There are approved oral appliances available to help with snoring.

Your dentist can make you a custom snoring device, but only after you have been officially diagnosed with an oral problem. This oral appliance is a device that fits like a retainer and looks like a mouth guard. It supports your jaw and tongue to maintain an open upper airway.

 

There are several benefits to using a custom-made snoring device over store-bought ones, including:

– The device is much more effective than any prefabricated one because

it’s specially designed for your mouth.

– A custom snore guard will last definitely longer than that one you can get over the counter.

– They are portable, so you can take them with you while traveling.

–  Oral appliances are far more comfortable than wearing a mask!

 

Why water is the right choice for your oral health?

– Drinking water helps prevent cavities and staining

For drinking sugary drinks you need to know that the sugars combine with the bacteria in your mouth and form acids that make cavities in your teeth. Having the occasional soda or sports drink is OK, Just when you make sure that drinking water is a regular part of your day!

Also, when you are outside until you can get home to brush and floss, drinking a glass of water and swishing it around a little in your mouth after having food, definitely helps a lot.

– Drinking water fights bad breath

Do you know why so many of us get “morning breath”? it`s because of the Bactria which grows in Dry mouth. You can stop morning breath by keeping hydrated with water. This also helps to produce saliva to wash away any lingering food particles that could contribute to bad breath or tooth decay.

– Fluoridated water helps fight tooth decay and cavities, especially with children!

Fluoride strengthens the tooth structure, making the entire tooth more resistant to decay. It also can repair the early stages of tooth decay.

Don’t forget to visit your dentist every six months for a dental exam and cleaning to make sure your smile stays healthy and strong.

Does Dental Implant work as my missing tooth?

Dental implants are used where there are one or more missing teeth. Implants are posts that are surgically placed in the upper or lower jaw, fuse with your jawbone and you will still have a certain amount of sensation with, when you chew and talk. Dental implants are replacement tooth roots.

There are many advantages to dental implants:

-Dental implants look and feel like your own teeth.They are designed to fuse with bone, so they become permanent.

– Dental implants allow you to speak without the worry that teeth might slip like those poor-fitting dentures.

– Because they become part of you, implants eliminate the discomfort of removable dentures, as well as the need for messy adhesives to keep them in place.

–  Sliding dentures can make chewing difficult. With dental implants you can eat your favorite foods with confidence and without pain.

– Dental implants can give you back your smile and help you feel better about yourself.

– Dental implants don’t require reducing other teeth, as a tooth supported bridge does. Because nearby teeth are not altered to support the implant, more of your own teeth are left intact, improving long-term oral health.

–  Dental implants require the same care as real teeth including: brushing, flossing, rinsing with mouthwash, and regular dental check-ups.With good care, many implants last a lifetime.

Call Our Office ( https://austindentalgroups.com)  to book your Implant consult with Dr.Ross when you would like to know if you are a good candidate for implant treatment or not.

 

What’s the Procedure for getting your Veneers?

Dental Veneers or porcelain laminates are tooth-colored, wafer-thin, custom-made shells bonded to the front of the teeth changing their color, size, length, or shape.

Getting a dental veneer usually requires at least three appointments with the dentist: one for a consultation and two others to make and apply the veneers.

  • The first step is when you explain what you expect to achieve and your dentist checks your teeth to see if dental veneers are appropriate for you, discuss what the procedure will involve and your dentist may take X-rays. Also, there is a possibility of making impressions of your mouth and teeth, on the same day.
  • Second appointment: Your dentist will remove about 1/2 millimeter of your tooth surface, approximately equal to the thickness of the veneer. Then, an impression of your tooth will be made to be sent out to the lab to construct your veneer. It usually takes 2-4 weeks to receive the veneers back. Meanwhile, Temporary dental veneers will be placed.
  • Third appointment: Before the dental veneer is permanently cemented, your dentist tries in the veneers repeatedly and may trim the veneer as needed to achieve the proper fit. Also, your dentist needs your confirmation about the proper color, size and fit before permanently bond and cement your veneers.
  • You might be asked to return for a follow-up visit in a couple of weeks to check gums and to once again examine the veneer’s placement.
  • If you need more information about Veneers, make a free appointment today to consult Dr.Shahriary.

Baby Teeth – When do they come in?

The most common questions we are asked about Baby teeth are “when will they come in?” and “when will they fall out?”. While the answer can vary – we have a general timeline for when we expect these things to occur.

Baby Teeth

Most children will have all 20 of their primary teeth by the time they are 3 years old. By age 21 all of your child’s permanent teeth should have erupted (with the exception of wisdom teeth which may or may not fully erupt.)

Caring for baby teeth can be difficult for parents.

From 1 to 2 years  

  • Brush your child’s teeth daily (using non-fluoridated toothpaste).
  • Check for signs of early childhood tooth decay once a month. Lift your child’s upper lip and look for chalky-white or brown spots on the teeth or along the gum line. If you see any, take your child to a dentist as soon as possible. Your dentist may suggest you start using a small amount (the size of a grain of rice) of fluoridated toothpaste.
  • Switch to a regular cup for all drinks between 12 and 15 months.
  • Limit soother use to nap and bedtime.
From 3 to 4 years old
  • Teach your child “2 for 2,” which means brushing twice a day for 2 minutes each time.
  • Start using fluoride toothpaste, the amount of a green pea, and teach them to spit rather than swallow.  Supervise your child while he/she is brushing teeth.
  • Encourage your child to do some brushing with you completing the job, making sure that all tooth surfaces have been cleaned.
  • If your child continues to suck her thumb as permanent teeth begin to appear, talk to your doctor or dentist.
For all ages
  • Wash your hands before and after brushing teeth.
  • Rinse toothbrushes thoroughly after brushing and ensure that each one can dry without touching other toothbrushes.
  • Replace toothbrushes every few months, when the bristles become flattened with use.
  • Between meals, quench a child’s thirst with water. Do not offer candy, dried fruit (including raisins) and sugared drinks or juices.
  • Take your child for regular dental visits (every 6 months, unless otherwise suggested by your dentist).

To schedule your child’s next cleaning Contact us! (604) 936-1263

What Happens During a Dental Cleaning?

Many people have mild to moderate dental phobias. A lack of understanding about what happens while you’re in the chair for a cleaning can add to this fear.

First Exam

Your hygienist will likely start by doing a quick exam of your mouth, noting and potential areas of concern to discuss with the dentist when they come in to perform a more thorough examination. They will use a small mirror to check your teeth and gums for any signs of inflammation, decay, and other issues.

Removing Plaque and Tartar

The hygienist will use a scaler during your cleaning to “scrape” plaque and tartar build-up around and under your gumline and between your teeth. They may also use a “cavitron” or water scaler in addition to or instead of hand instruments to remove build up.
If this is your least favourite part of your cleanings remember that improved oral health (proper brushing and flossing) reduces the amount of tartar and plaque in your mouth. Less tartar and plaque = less time scaling (scraping).

Polishing

This is when the hygienist uses a high powered electric rotating rubber cup to apply a gritty toothpaste to your teeth. The high-pitched sound can be intimidating but this part of your cleaning is important for removing surface stains.

Professional Flossing

No one is more skilled at flossing your teeth than a hygienist. It might seem silly to have your hygienist floss your teeth during your cleaning if you’ve already flossed that day, but this helps to remove any leftover plaque, polishing paste or debris.

Fluoride Treatment

There are a few different options available for fluoride treatments. (Not all dentists carry all options.) Most common are fluoride trays: foam trays that fit over your teeth and are filled with a flavoured gel or foam fluoride and placed in your mouth for 1 minute. There is also a flavoured paint-on varnish that stays on your teeth until you brush it off at night. Least effective, but a good option for people with a strong gag reflex is a fluoride ride that you swish in your mouth for one minute. Fluoride helps to strengthen enamel and prevent tooth decay. It is an important part of your regular cleaning.

Post-Cleaning Exam

Your dentist will then come in and review any notes your hygienist has made, and perform their own exam with the help of a small handheld mirror. In this time they may find spots of potential decay and recommend x-rays to be certain. Other concerns your dentist is looking for is bite/jaw issues, the need for orthodontic referral, or referral to a periodontist if your gums have deep pockets around the teeth.

Contact us today to schedule your next cleaning and check up! (604) 936-1263

Pregnancy and how it affects your oral health.

While keeping your mouth healthy is important, it becomes even more so during pregnancy. As your hormones change you may face oral health issues such as gum and bone disease. The following preventative measures will help keep your smile healthy and reduce risks such as low birth weight and pre-term delivery.

Morning Sickness

One of the most problematic symptoms you can experience in pregnancy is morning sickness. Repeated exposure to stomach acid can wreak havoc on your enamel causing tooth decay and erosion. These steps should be taken following any episodes of vomiting:

  • Rinse your mouth with water or fluoride mouth wash (if you can stand it) immediately following the episode
  • After rinsing your mouth, wait for at least 30 minutes to further reduce the acid in your mouth
  • Brush your teeth

Preventative Measures

Daily:

  • Floss
  • Brush your teeth at least twice per day with a fluoride toothpaste using a soft bristled toothbrush
  • Drink fluoridated water where available

Schedule a checkup and cleaning in your first trimester to assess the current state of your oral health.

Bleeding Gums

Your hormone changes can affect your gums. They may be more sensitive and they might bleed easily, even if you have good oral hygiene.

“Pregnancy Gingivitis”

Between months 3 and 9 gestation, you may experience pregnancy gingivitis. This is when your gums become swollen, red, and/or irritated from bacteria along your gumline. It is important to see your dentist during pregnancy as gingivitis may turn into periodontitis. Most pregnancy-related gum issues will resolve themselves after giving birth, however, if they do not it is important to schedule an appointment with your dentist.

Visiting Your Dentist

If you do need dental work during pregnancy – the best time to have your work completed is during your second trimester. It is a good idea to avoid X-rays while you are pregnant. X-rays of your mouth should only be taken in an emergency. If you need an X-ray, make sure you are covered with a lead apron to protect your baby from the radiation.

Contact us today to set up your next appointment!

TMJ Awareness Month – November

TMJ

If you experience excessive clenching, grinding, or “lockjaw”- you could suffer from TMJ disorder. TMJ refers to the temporomandibular joint; the joint which connects your lower jaw to your skull. This joint works like a hinge allowing us to talk, chew, and make facial expressions. TMJ problems can begin from a number of factors including stress, sleeping on one side of the jaw, excessive gum chewing, anxiety, overextending your jaw (by yawning, etc..). Leaving a TMJ disorder untreated can worsen other symptoms such as headache, earache, neck joint/muscle pain, etc…

In severe cases, chronic grinding can lead to loosening, fracturing, or loss of teeth. Over time, it can even change the appearance of your face. Since teeth grinding usually occurs during sleep, it can lead to sleep issues, including sleep apnea, a potentially dangerous disorder in which sleep is disrupted by interruptions in breathing and shallow breaths.

Treatment Options

What you can do to help yourself:

If you find yourself clenching or grinding in stressful situations there are self-care practices you can try to reduce symptoms:

  • Reduced consumption of alcohol and foods and drinks that contain caffeine
  • Avoiding gum chewing and eating hard candy
  • Not chewing on pencils, pens or other non-food objects
  • Consciously relaxing your jaw and your facial muscles throughout the day
  • Positioning the tip of your tongue between your teeth when you have the urge to clench your teeth, which helps train your jaw muscles to relax
  • Increased intake of water

Medical Steps:

If your clenching and grinding occur at night when it is not consciously controllable, there are devices that can be made by your dentist to help! A custom-made night guard (designed for your teeth only) fit tightly around your upper or lower teeth to prevent wear to your dentition and help control the urge to clench. Many dental insurance companies cover these types of night guards which helps reduce your cost out of pocket.

To book a TMJ consultation appointment call or email us today!

 

I Just Had a Filling – Why does my tooth still hurt?

So your dentist recommended you have a filling done, but now a tooth that didn’t bother you before is hurting! Yikes!

Before you start panicking there are a few reasons this could happen. Firstly – is the pain you are experiencing upon biting or chewing? or is it a constant ache?

Pain with biting/chewing

If the pain/sensitivity is with biting or chewing, chances are your filling needs a slight adjustment! When the dentist checks your bite after performing a filling, sometimes you’re so frozen it’s hard to get a good idea if your bite feels “normal” or not. Even the slightest bit of filling material being too high, or left over bonding agent can cause sensitivity with biting if you have a “tight” bite.

Typically, we can see you the same day for a quick appointment (that requires no freezing) to adjust the filling.

Constant Ache

If your pain is more of a constant ache there are two possible issues. Your pain may be associated with the injection site for the anesthetic. Some people are very sensitive to freezing and can experience and ache/bruised feeling in their jaw from the anesthetic – especially in the lower jaw. The best course of action is to wait a day or two to see if the ache gets better.

The other possibility with a constant ache is that the decay was much deeper than expected. While we always try our best to prevent a tooth from needing a root canal, sometimes the decay is so deep we have no choice. When Dr. Ross performs a filling where the decay is deep in the tooth, he will often place a medication to desensitize the tooth and help it “calm down”.  If this doesn’t work, a root canal may be the best course of treatment to fix the tooth.

Whatever the problem may be – we’re here to help you fix it. Call or email us today! https://austindentalgroups.com/contact/