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Costumes Inspired by your Dental Office!

Not sure which costume to buy this year? Need some last minute inspiration? We’ve got you! No one else at the party will be wearing these!

Darla from Finding Nemo

Costume

Who could forget Darla the “Fish Killer” from Finding Nemo? She’s the niece of Dr. P. Sherman (42 Wallaby Way, Sydney) and with a Dentist for an Uncle you know she’s getting a deep discount on that headgear!

Toothbrush, Toothpaste, and Tooth

The classic trio. If you’re looking for group costumes, this is a combo that’s sure to stand out. You might even remind your friends to brush after all of that sticky candy you’ll be eating Halloween night.

Gag Teeth

Costume

Now this is crazy – kudos to the parents who spent the time to make this get-up. No one else in their class will have this costume.

The Tooth Fairy

Of course, you could go with the traditional beautiful woman in a tutu with wings and a tooth wand – but there’s something hilarious about a grown man in a leotard.

Your Dentist, of course!

Costume

This year a costume that already incorporates a mask is PERFECT.

And finally the scariest costume of all…

The Patient

Costume

She tells you she flosses everyday, but her gums say otherwise. Nothing is scarier to a hygienist than this patient!

 

Whatever you go as this Halloween, be safe, have fun, and give us a call if all the sweets give you a tooth ache!

 

Happy Halloween from Dr. Shahriary and Staff!

Iconic Teeth From Your Favourite Movies

Halloween is coming up – this year your costume can be instantly recognizable with some iconic teeth! Movies and TV shows use prosthetic teeth, natural imperfections in the actors teeth, and make up to give their characters a distinct look.

Winifred Sanderson, Hocus Pocus

The oldest of the Sanderson sisters was obsessed with beauty and youth so it makes sense that the costume designers gave her comically large teeth that don’t meet “conventional” beauty standards.

Austin Powers, The Austin Powers movies

Powers’ bad teeth were created by a dental technician named Gary Archer. Mike Myers came to Archer and told him, “I want bad British 1960s teeth”, based on a widely-held stereotype. Archer took pictures and made drawings of British patrons at an English pub that he often visited and the pictures became the inspiration for the final design Archer showed Myers, resulting in his iconic smile.

Lloyd Christmas, The Dumb and Dumber movies

When Jim Carrey was a child he got into a fight, resulting in the chip in his front tooth. The tooth was capped and Carrey had it temporarily removed to portray Lloyd Christmas.

The Mad Hatter, Alice in Wonderland

Johnny Depp has said the Mad Hatter’s iconic smile was inspired by comedian Terry Thomas’ diastema. In an interview Depp said, “the French call the teeth with the gap in the middle ‘les dents de bonheur’ – ‘the teeth of happiness’,”. A fitting inspiration for the (sometimes) jovial Mad Hatter.

Harry Lyme, Home Alone 1 and 2.

Harry’s gold tooth plays an important role in his identification. When he first enters the McCallister’s house impersonating a police officer, Kevin notices his gold tooth when he smiles. As a result when Kevin is almost hit by Harry and Marv’s van Harry smiles at him again and Kevin notices the gold tooth, blowing his cover as a police officer.

Stu Price, The Hangover

Did Ed Helms REALLY pull out his own tooth for a movie role?! Well, kind of! When Helms was a teenager he had a dental implant placed. Instead of blacking out a tooth for the movie he decided to talk to his dentist to see if he could have the 20 year old implant crown temporarily removed. His dentist agreed to remove it and the rest is movie history!

Belletrix Lestrange, Harry Potter Movies

Though Belletrix’s rotten teeth are never specified in J.K. Rowlings’ book, actress Helena Bohnam Carter felt the gnarly teeth would give her character a feral look. As Bellatrix had spent so much time in prison, Carter felt her teeth should look savage and deranged as she hoped to portray her as such.

Dracula – 1958 Starring Christopher Lee

Vampire fangs have an interesting history in Hollywood as most people associate fangs with Bela Lugosi’s popular 1931 portrayal. Lugosi, however, never wore fangs in his role as Dracula. In the era before microphones actors needed to enunciate for optimal clarity; prosthetic fangs impeded this greatly. Fangs were not popularized in vampire films until Christopher Lee’s iconic portrayal in 1958.

Let us clean up your “fangs”! Call today to book an appointment.

I Just Had a Filling – Why does my tooth still hurt?

So your dentist recommended you have a filling done, but now a tooth that didn’t bother you before is hurting! Yikes!

Before you start panicking there are a few reasons this could happen. Firstly – is the pain you are experiencing upon biting or chewing? or is it a constant ache?

Pain with biting/chewing

If the pain/sensitivity is with biting or chewing, chances are your filling needs a slight adjustment! When the dentist checks your bite after performing a filling, sometimes you’re so frozen it’s hard to get a good idea if your bite feels “normal” or not. Even the slightest bit of filling material being too high, or left over bonding agent can cause sensitivity with biting if you have a “tight” bite.

Typically, we can see you the same day for a quick appointment (that requires no freezing) to adjust the filling.

Constant Ache

If your pain is more of a constant ache there are two possible issues. Your pain may be associated with the injection site for the anesthetic. Some people are very sensitive to freezing and can experience and ache/bruised feeling in their jaw from the anesthetic – especially in the lower jaw. The best course of action is to wait a day or two to see if the ache gets better.

The other possibility with a constant ache is that the decay was much deeper than expected. While we always try our best to prevent a tooth from needing a root canal, sometimes the decay is so deep we have no choice. When Dr. Ross performs a filling where the decay is deep in the tooth, he will often place a medication to desensitize the tooth and help it “calm down”.  If this doesn’t work, a root canal may be the best course of treatment to fix the tooth.

Whatever the problem may be – we’re here to help you fix it. Call or email us today! https://austindentalgroups.com/contact/

 

Help! I lost my tooth. What now?

Whether you tripped in the grocery store or participated in a particularly lively game of hockey, losing a tooth can be an upsetting ordeal! It’s important to remain calm and call your dentist as soon as possible.

By following these steps – there is still hope:

  1. DO NOT clean, brush or scrub the tooth – even if it’s covered in blood.
  2. Place it in a small container of your own saliva, milk, or saline solution if available.
  3. See your dental professional as soon as possible (ideally within 30 minutes). Don’t forget to bring it with you.

With prompt attention, a permanent tooth may be re-implanted into the socket and remain normal and healthy.

While it will eventually need a root canal and crown, it is always better to retain your natural tooth than to have to replace it with a prosthetic.

When participating in sports, always wear a mouth guard. Check out our blog on mouth guards: https://austindentalgroups.com/uncategorized/how-mouth-guards-help-protect-athletes/

If you’re having a dental emergency call us today! (604) 936-1263

 

First in Dental History – Back to School!

With the school year fast approaching, let’s take a minute to learn about where modern day dentistry first started:

Ancient Dentistry

5000 BC – “Tooth worms” is described as the cause of decay in a Sumerian text.

166-201 AD – The Etruscans (ancient French and Italians) practice dental prosthetics such as gold crowns and fixed bridgework.

The Middle-Ages

700 AD – An ancient Chinese medical text mentions the use of an amalgam filling material referred to as “silver paste”.

1210 AD – The “Guild of Barbers” is established. These barbers could perform bloodletting, teeth pulling, and cupping therapy-in addition to cutting your hair and shaving facial hair. (YIKES)

18th Century

1723 – Pierre Fauchard (“The Father of Modern Dentistry”) publishes The Surgeon Dentist, A Treatise on Teeth (Le Chirurgien Dentiste). The book was the first to describe a comprehensive system for the practice of dentistry including basic oral anatomy and function, operative and restorative techniques, and denture construction.

1768-1770 – In the first known case of post-mortem dental forensics, Paul Revere identifies his friend’s body from a bridge he had constructed for him.

1790 – The first “dental drill” operated by foot pedal is created by John Greenwood out of his mother’s foot treadle spinning wheel.

19th Century

1825 – Commercially manufactured porcelain teeth hit the market

1864 – The rubber dam is invented, a device still used today to isolate the tooth from the oral cavity during procedures.

1866 – Dr. Lucy Beaman Hobbs becomes the first woman to earn a dental degree.

1869 – Dr. Robert Tanner Freeman becomes the first African-American to earn a dental degree.

1880 – Toothpaste is revolutionized with the invention of the collapsible metal tube. Previously, toothpaste was sold in liquid or powder form (made by dentists) and packaged in bottles, pots, or paper boxes.

1896 – Dr. C. Edmond Kells takes the first dental x-ray of a living person in the U.S.

20th Century

1905 – A German chemist formulates a local anesthetic and markets it under the name “novocaine”

1937 – Alvin Strock inserts the first Vitallium (biocompatible implant metal) dental screw implant.

1950 – The first fluoride toothpastes are marketed and become industry standard within 20 years.

1960 – Lasers are developed and approved for soft-tissue work.

1989 – The first commercial home tooth bleaching product is marketed.

Many, many more developments in materials and procedures have occurred since then and come to form dentistry as we know it today. Stop in to our friendly Coquitlam office and book your next cleaning and check up with Dr. Shahriary! Call Today (604) 936-1263

 

Why 1 in 3 Middle-Aged Americans are Embarrassed by their teeth

A national poll taken by the University of Michigan on Healthy Aging found that a third of Americans between the ages of 50 and 64 have said the condition of their teeth has caused pain, difficulty eating, missed work, and other health problems.

56% of respondents also say that they only seek dental care for serious dental problems. Lack of adequate dental insurance seems to be the main issue as overall, 28% of respondents reported not having any sort of dental coverage. Looking to the future, over half of the respondents did not know how they would obtain dental insurance once they turned 65.

When you visit a dentist, it is the dentist’s job to make you a treatment plan based on your oral health needs. It’s your right to decide whether or not you want to go ahead with any treatment. If you don’t have a dental plan, Dr.Ross Shahriary and staff can help to give you information about the options available to you.

The good news is that by brushing, flossing and visiting your dentist regularly for dental exams (which are less expensive than fixing serious dental problems) you can avoid costly dental treatment.