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We’re a Family Practice with Long-Term Staff!

Even our receptionist, Dani, has been coming to our office for 27 years!

We’d love to see you and your family for your next dental appointments. Call today! (604) 936-1263

 

 

 

First in Dental History – Back to School!

With the school year fast approaching, let’s take a minute to learn about where modern day dentistry first started:

Ancient Dentistry

5000 BC – “Tooth worms” is described as the cause of decay in a Sumerian text.

166-201 AD – The Etruscans (ancient French and Italians) practice dental prosthetics such as gold crowns and fixed bridgework.

The Middle-Ages

700 AD – An ancient Chinese medical text mentions the use of an amalgam filling material referred to as “silver paste”.

1210 AD – The “Guild of Barbers” is established. These barbers could perform bloodletting, teeth pulling, and cupping therapy-in addition to cutting your hair and shaving facial hair. (YIKES)

18th Century

1723 – Pierre Fauchard (“The Father of Modern Dentistry”) publishes The Surgeon Dentist, A Treatise on Teeth (Le Chirurgien Dentiste). The book was the first to describe a comprehensive system for the practice of dentistry including basic oral anatomy and function, operative and restorative techniques, and denture construction.

1768-1770 – In the first known case of post-mortem dental forensics, Paul Revere identifies his friend’s body from a bridge he had constructed for him.

1790 – The first “dental drill” operated by foot pedal is created by John Greenwood out of his mother’s foot treadle spinning wheel.

19th Century

1825 – Commercially manufactured porcelain teeth hit the market

1864 – The rubber dam is invented, a device still used today to isolate the tooth from the oral cavity during procedures.

1866 – Dr. Lucy Beaman Hobbs becomes the first woman to earn a dental degree.

1869 – Dr. Robert Tanner Freeman becomes the first African-American to earn a dental degree.

1880 – Toothpaste is revolutionized with the invention of the collapsible metal tube. Previously, toothpaste was sold in liquid or powder form (made by dentists) and packaged in bottles, pots, or paper boxes.

1896 – Dr. C. Edmond Kells takes the first dental x-ray of a living person in the U.S.

20th Century

1905 – A German chemist formulates a local anesthetic and markets it under the name “novocaine”

1937 – Alvin Strock inserts the first Vitallium (biocompatible implant metal) dental screw implant.

1950 – The first fluoride toothpastes are marketed and become industry standard within 20 years.

1960 – Lasers are developed and approved for soft-tissue work.

1989 – The first commercial home tooth bleaching product is marketed.

Many, many more developments in materials and procedures have occurred since then and come to form dentistry as we know it today. Stop in to our friendly Coquitlam office and book your next cleaning and check up with Dr. Shahriary! Call Today (604) 936-1263

 

Am I doing my flossing right?

Did you know there is a right and a wrong way to floss? Many patients receive oral hygiene instructions when they are young but do not receive tips or information about their technique later in life to “refresh” their knowledge.

How to FLOSS

  1. Pull 18 to 24 inches of dental floss from the floss dispenser.
  2. Wrap the ends of the floss around your index and middle fingers.
  3. Hold the floss tightly around each tooth in a C shape; move the floss back and forth in a push-pull motion and up and down against the side of each tooth.

We are happy to provide oral hygiene instruction, tips, or answer your questions at your regularly scheduled appointments. Schedule yours today! (604) 936-1263

Why are my teeth YELLOW?

Some of us have naturally beautiful, bright white smiles – but for the rest of us, we’re left wondering: WHY are my teeth so YELLOW?

A number of factors contribute to the yellowing of our teeth:

Age

As we age the hard outer layer of our tooth (called enamel), gets thinner from brushing, eating, etc… As the enamel thins more and more of the soft, darker core of the tooth (called dentin) shows through.

Food and Drink

Intense colour pigments called chromogens that attach to the white, outer shell of your tooth (enamel) also cause staining. Coffee, tea, red wine, and beets are some of the worst culprits.

Medications

Certain medications have the unfortunate side effect of darkening and staining teeth. Antihistamines, antipsychotics, high blood pressure medications, and chemotherapy all may discolour teeth.
Commonly, young children or babies who are prescribed tetracyclines and doxycycline when their teeth are still forming may have discoloration of their adult teeth later in life

Trauma

Trauma to your teeth may cause them to change colour as the body’s reaction to tooth trauma is to lay down more dentin. As dentin is the darker layer under your enamel it begins to show through more.

Tobacco

Tar (which is naturally dark) and nicotine (which is colourless until it’s mixed with oxygen) are both chemicals found in tobacco products.

If you’re unhappy with your yellow smile Dr. Shahriary’s Office offers several different options to whiten and brighten your teeth! Call Today (604) 936-1263

Whitening – What are the options?

There are many different teeth bleaching options available over the counter and in office, but which is best for you?

 

Whitening Strips

Over-the-counter whitening strips like Crest White Strips are a popular option due to their low cost. The strips are sold as a thin, flexible membrane coated with bleaching material that conforms to the shape of your teeth.

Pros:

  • They can be worn comfortably at home or on the go, making them a convenient option.
  • Cost effective

Cons:

  • Not suitable for crooked teeth
  • Often misses the areas between the teeth
  • Saliva can get under the membrane and dilute the bleach
  • Not ideal for a “wide smile” as they are “one size fits all”
  • The strips are prone to slip and slide out of place
  • Low concentration of bleach

Brush-On Whiteners

Often sold in pen style applicators with foam or brush tip applicators, brush-on whiteners are the least expensive option. They are most effective when applied directly after a meal or beverage with high colour content (beets, red wine, etc…). While this product claims to whiten your teeth, they act as more of an “antidote” to new stains.

Pros:

  • Inexpensive
  • Convenient

Cons:

  • Does not show meaningful results as a “whitening” tool

Custom Bleach Trays (Opalescense)

Unlike whitening strips, custom bleach trays are made specifically for your teeth and can not be shared with others. First an impression is take of your mouth and model is made of your teeth. Then a tray is formed around the model using a thin, flexible plastic material. The dental office then provides you with concentrated bleaching gel in syringe applicators and instructions on how to use the bleach at home.

Pros:

  • Extremely effective whitening
  • Ideal for people with crooked teeth as the bleach reaches all surfaces of the teeth
  • Long term results, often lasting 6 months or more
  • Concentrated bleach gel often gives drastic results within 2 weeks
  • Shaped to prevent bleach from coming into contact with your gums (when used correctly)

Cons:

  • Can cause sensitivity
  • Significantly higher cost than over-the-counter bleaching solutions due to the medical grade whitening gels

In-Office Whitening (Opalescence Boost)

In-office whitening is performed by your Dentist or Dental Hygienist. A cheek retractor is placed in the mouth to pull your lips and cheeks away from your teeth. Then a protective gel is placed on to your gum line and light-cured to guard your gums from the potent bleaching materials. A layer of whitening gel is painted on to your teeth and left for 20 minutes, then removed and applied again for an additional 20 minutes. Multiple visits may be required for desired results.

Pros:

  • Highest concentration bleach, causing drastic shade changes
  • Quick, sometimes immediate results

Cons:

  • Can cause sensitivity due to high concentration bleach
  • May require multiple appointments for desired results
  • The least cost effective option
  • Some people find the cheek retractors uncomfortable as they stay in the mouth for almost an hour

Dr. Shahriary is happy to discuss your bleaching needs with you. Call today to book a consultation and start your journey to your perfect smile! (604) 936-1263

As us about Opalescence Go! a whitening strip/custom tray hybrid! (604) 936-1263

Why do I need Fluoride?

Anyone who has seen their Dentist for a regular cleaning and check up knows that a fluoride treatment will be offered at the end of the appointment, but why?

Fluoride reduces the ability of plaque bacteria to produce acid, and repairs tooth decay by building up the tooth in a process called remineralization. In fact, the occurrence of cavities has significantly dropped since the 1960’s after the American Dental Association approved the use of Crest’s first fluoridated toothpaste.

While it is important to use a fluoride toothpaste regularly, having a higher dose of concentrated fluoride treatment at your dental cleaning appointments is the most effective way to prevent decay.

If you have any questions about fluoride or you’re ready to schedule your next cleaning and check up, give us a call! Dr. Shahriary and his staff would be happy to help!

604-936-1263

Dental Sealants – What are they and why is my Dentist recommending them?

Dental sealants are a great way to prevent decay from forming in the grooves of our teeth. Teeth are formed with grooves and pits in them that can trap food and the longer these food particles stay trapped in these areas the more likely they are to develop decay.

While most of us are aware of the traditional way of cleaning our teeth ie: brushing, flossing, and mouthwash; manual plaque removal does not always work when your teeth have deep fissures in their surfaces. When this happens your Dentist may recommend dental sealants to help with the deeper, uncleanable grooves. Dentists recommend dental sealants most often when children’s permanent premolars and molars are erupting into the mouth.

Sealants require no freezing and are a thin, transparent resin painted onto the biting surface of the tooth and light cured to harden. The resin fills in the narrow grooves, decreasing your risk of decay. Sealants generally last 5-8 years before needing to be reapplied.

Dr. Shahriary can tell you at your next visit if any of your teeth should be sealed and protected, because not all teeth need sealants.

Remember to maintain regular visits to the dentist for dental examinations and professional cleanings.

Call Today! (604) 936-1263

 

Gingivitis – Are You At Risk?

Gingivitis is a term many of us have heard before, but many of us do not know our risk factor or how to identify symptoms!

While gingivitis is a “non-destructive” type of periodontal disease, it can progress to periodontitis if left untreated. Periodontitis is a much more serious disease which can lead to tooth loss.

Many patients do not even know they have a form of gingivitis as the symptoms can be mild. Thankfully, mild cases can be resolved at home with improving your oral hygiene habits by brushing and flossing more frequently, and including an antiseptic mouth rinse (such as Lysterine) in your dental routine.

Know the Symptoms of Gingivitis:

  • bright red or purple gums
  • tender gums that may be painful to the touch
  • bleeding from the gums when brushing or flossing
  • bad breath, or “halitosis”
  • inflammation, or swollen gums
  • receding gums
  • soft gums

Some people are at higher risk of periodontal diseases, including people with cancer, HIV, and diabetes. Other risk factors include smoking, poor diet, hormonal changes (such as pregnancy, puberty, menopause, and the menstrual cycle), age, family history, and certain medications.

Proper dental care is the most effective way to reverse periodontal disease.

The first step to a healthy mouth is to come in for a hygiene appointment. One of our friendly hygienists will remove the built up plaque and tartar from your teeth by scaling or root planing. This can be uncomfortable if your build up is extensive or your gums are inflamed and sensitive, however, we will take the utmost care to make this appointment as comfortable as possible. You will receive instruction on how to properly floss and brush your teeth, and a follow-up appointment will be made for your next cleaning.

If left untreated, periodontitis can have serious repercussions:

Complications of untreated periodontal disease:

  • abscess or infection in the gingiva or jaw bone
  • periodontitis, a more serious condition that can lead to loss of bone and teeth
  • recurrent gingivitis
  • trench mouth, where bacterial infection leads to ulceration of the gums

Furthermore, several studies have linked periodontal disease to heart attack, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases. Other studies have also found periodontal disease to be a risk factor for lung disease.

If you believe you have mild-severe periodontal disease, call today to book an appointment with Dr. Shahriary and our talented hygienists. (604) 936-1263

Bad Breath: Why you have it and how we can help you.

When you chow down on your favourite foods, you’re also treating the bacteria in your mouth to a great meal. When they snack on the food left behind after your last meal they release foul-smelling odors as a by-product, causing bad breath.

Cleaning your teeth after every meal greatly reduces smells left behind. This includes brushing, flossing, and using a mouth wash, such as Lysterine.

Certain foods and beverages can also increase the likelihood of bad breath. Things like garlic, onions, coffee, alcohol, and sugary foods and drinks cultivate bad breath. Instead, choose foods high in water content such as carrots, celery, and apples which work like a “natural tooth brush” and scrub plaque bacteria from the surfaces of your teeth. Drinking water regularly also helps by washing away food debris and increasing saliva flow in your mouth.

Morning breath is a problem we all face. During the day our saliva works to wash away food debris and keep bacteria in check, however, at night our saliva production goes down – causing our mouths to become dry and creating the perfect breeding ground for odor.

The best way to keep your morning breath in check is to follow a good oral hygiene routine. Brushing and flossing before bed and when you wake in the morning are great preventative measures, but also using a tongue scraper and keeping a glass of water at your bedside to keep your mouth moisturized through the night.

Bad breath is manageable but if the severity doesn’t lessen after taking these preventative steps it may be a sign of a larger problem. Gum disease, diabetes, sinus problems, gastric reflux, and liver or kidney disease can all present bad breath symptoms.

Dr. Shahriary and staff are here to help you with all of your oral concerns. If you’re concerned about your bad breath, come see us for your personalized recommendations!

How Mouth-Guards Help Protect Athletes

 

Today one of my Athletic patients asked me about mouth guards and how mouth guards can help to protect her teeth.

Our mission as your family dentist is to improve your oral health and, generally speaking, protect your mouth from any unpredictable injuries and parafunctional habits.

A properly fitted mouth guard must be protective, comfortable, resilient, tear resistant, odorless, tasteless, well fitting, and cause minimal interference to speaking and breathing – a critical aspect of any sport.

Unfortunately, the term “mouth guard” is universal and includes a large range of products from the over-the-counter boil and bite models to the professionally manufactured and custom fit sports mouth guards provided by our practice. GENERIC over-the-counter sports mouth guards DO NOT provide the same protection available from a properly fitted custom made sports mouth guard at our office.

To get a custom fit mouth guard, our patients visit our Coquitlam dental office for two appointments. The first is only 30 minutes long when our assistant takes an impression of your upper and lower teeth using a quick setting polymer gel.  Then at the second appointment, about a week later, we will have you try in the mouth guard and we will adjust any areas of tightness or discomfort.

It’s important to note that all sports mouth guards should be replaced after 24 months or two ‘seasons’ of play because they can wear down over time, making them less effective.

Replacement sports guards are especially important for adolescents because their mouths continue to grow as their teeth develop into adulthood. Many athletes who play different sports order new mouth guards from our dental office every six months as part of their routine dental check-up.